Welcome to our Sheep and Goat Breed Display! In this area of the Festival you can visit many different breeds of fiber producing Sheep and Goats. Visit with the shepherds who raise them and feel the various fleeces as well as purchase items produced from these specific breeds .

In addition to the sheep and Goat Breed Display in the Sheep Barn you can visit Alpacas, Llamas and Angoras Rabbits in the vendor area of the Cattle Barn.

Angora Goats ~ Aboundingful Farm

Aboundingful Farm is home to a small flock of Colored Angora Goats in Lebanon County, PA. Angora goats grow silky, soft, curled ringlets or wavy locks of lustrous fiber called “mohair.” Because this beautiful hair grows so fast–about an inch per month–the Angora goat is called the most efficient fiber producer on earth. Our goats are shorn twice a year: spring and fall. Mohair is called the “diamond fiber” because of its unique ability to allow light to pass through its very strong hair shaft, giving an unmatched lustrous shine.

Adult bucks average 125-175 lbs and does 80 -125 lbs. Both sexes have horns which are one of the breed standards and contribute to their beauty and graceful appearance. Horns also assist in cooling the animals in hot climates. Angoras are seasonal breeders typically kidding from January through April.

The name Angora reflects this breed’s roots in the region around Ankara, today’s capital city of Turkey. This same mountainous region is believed to have been the birthplace of the Angora rabbit.

Products we offer from our goats:

  • Handspun Yarns
  • Washed Natural Color locks in a variety of shades
  • Washed and Dyed locks in bright colors

Website: aboundingfulfarm.com

Facebook: Aboundingful Farm

Breed Association: Colored Angora Goat Breeders Association

Black Welsh Mountain Sheep ~ Wilde Thistle Farm

We are a small farm in Fairplay MD. The majority of our animals are for our kid, Tucker and Robbie to show in 4-H. The others are just for pets because we love animals. We have dairy steers, a donkey, meat and dairy goats, sheep, rabbits, pet pigs and a variety of poultry

The Black Welsh Mountain is the only completely black sheep breed in Britain. It was developed in the mountains of Wales from black sheep that occurred in the Welsh Mountain breed, which was white. About a century ago, Welsh shepherds began to breed the black sheep together, also selecting for a finer fleece and improved body conformation. The resulting breed was recognized in 1922 with the establishment of the Black Welsh Mountain Sheep Society. These sheep were first imported into North America in 1972 by Thomas Wyman of Easton, Maryland. The U.S. breed registry was established in 1990.

Black Welsh Mountain sheep are small to medium in size. Rams have attractive horns that curl around the ears, ewes are polled. The wool is short, thick, and densely stapled. The staple length is 5 to 10 cm, and the fiber diameter ranges between 28 to 36 microns. The average wool clip is three to four pounds per sheep. Black Welsh Mountain wool is attractive to hand spinners. The natural black color makes it valuable for use undyed or in combination with other wools, when it is used to make grays or in the manufacture of tweeds and other patterns.

The breed has been promoted as an exotic sheep in North America, and this has made the breed a well-kept secret in the sheep industry and among sheep producers. Its qualities, however, make the breed a natural choice for sustainable sheep producers.

Products we offer from our sheep:

  • Breeding Stock

Facebook: Wilde Thistle Farm

Breed Association: American Black Welsh Mountain Sheep Association

Gotland Sheep – Quinta Melo Gotlands

We purchased out first Gotland sheep in 2012 for my daughter Mercy, who was very active in 4-H. My love of the Gotland breed led me to continue this venture. Gotlands are a Swedish sheep breed, medium sized, with a fine bone structure. They are best known for their high luster, curly silver locks. They are very curious and friendly. The lambs are born solid black, and turn silver over week to months. Please feel free to reach out with any questions you may have – I’m always happy to talk about my sheep!

Products we offer from our sheep:

  • Raw Fleece
  • Roving
  • Millspun yarn
  • Pelts
  • Breeding Stock

Facebook: Quinta Melo Gotlands

Breed Association: American Gotland Sheep Society

Virtual Farm Visit: Quinta Melo Gotlands

Icelandic Sheep – Trinity Farm

Overlooking Cayuga Lake in central New York, Trinity Farm is home to Icelandic Sheep with a focus on Icelandic Leadersheep (Forystufé).  We have been raising these sheep since 2007, and since 2009 have been using the technique of VAI to produce lambs with the best genetics from Iceland.  Trinity Farm lambs can be found on farms from Washington to New Mexico to Mississippi to Maine.

The Icelandic Sheep are known from the earliest settlement of Iceland and have been isolated there, so are the oldest pure sheep breeds in the world. They are known as triple-purpose animals, providing meat, milk and wool. Icelandic Leadersheep, known from the earliest writings of Iceland and recently accepted as a separate breed, have the same milk and fiber characteristics as the “usual” Icelandics.  However, these Leadersheep, historically more valuable than the “usual” Icelandics, were selected and bred for their intelligence, sense of direction, ability to detect imminent weather changes, etc., rather than for a meaty frame.

The fleece is double coated, with a long rather coarse top coat (tog) and fine undercoat (thel); these coats can be separated, thereby producing three types of yarn. Pure thel is soft enough for baby clothing; pure tog makes wonderful strong rug warp, etc., and the combined coats (known as lopi) produce warm and water resistant clothing. Both the “usual” Icelandic sheep and the Icelandic Leader Sheep have a huge number of fleece color characteristics: two colors, six patterns (some of which may be co-expressed) and the possibility of spotting.  A sheep for any taste!

Products we offer from our sheep:

  • Registered Breeding Stock
  • Unregistered stock (wethers only)
  • Raw Fleece
  • Washed Fleece
  • White or Natural Colored Locks
  • Dyed locks
  • Roving
  • Handspun Yarn
  • Felted Items
  • Handcrafted Items
  • Sheep Milk Soap
  • Other: Pelts, “vegetarian” pelts

Website: trinityfarm.net

Facebook: Trinity Farm

Breed Association: Icelandic Sheep Breeders of North America

Leicester Longwool Sheep ~ Aboundingful Farm

We are a small farm in Lebanon County PA. One of our sheep breeds is the Rare Breed Leicester Longwool Sheep.

​The Leicester (pronounced les-ter) Longwool is one of the “luster longwool” breeds, so designated for the sheen and brilliance of their wool. The sheep appear to shine just after shearing, when the clean wool next to their skin catches the sunlight and makes them glisten for a few days before the dust and dirt of their environment catches up to them and the glow is hidden for another year.

The breed was developed in England in the mid 1700s by innovative breeder Robert Bakewell. During the 1800s, the breed lost favor to the Merino and other fine wool breeds. After 1900, the Leicester Longwool fell into decline and was likely extinct in the United States during the 1930s or 1940s. In 1990, The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, reestablished the breed in North America by importing sheep from Australia.

With the help of dedicated breeders they have moved from Critical Threatened by the Livestock Conservency with fewer than 1,000 annual registrations in the United States and estimated global population less than 5,000.

Products we offer from our sheep:

  • Raw Fleece
  • Washed Fleece or locks
  • Roving
  • Millspun yarn
  • Handspun yarn
  • Felted items
  • Breeding Stock

Website: aboundingfulfarm.com

Facebook: Aboundingful Farm

Breed Association: Leicester Longwool Sheep Breeders Association

Romeldale CVM Sheep ~ Finally Able Farm

Romeldale/CVM sheep, which are a rare breed listed as Threatened on The Livestock Conservancy’s Conservation Priority List. Romeldale CVM are a dual-purpose, fine fiber breed that comes in a variety of colors including white, rose gray, medium and dark grays, brown (moorit), and black.

​Romeldale/CVM sheep are a multi-purpose sheep breed used for both their fine wool and mild tasting meat. Romeldale sheep are white and natural colors; their CVM derivatives come in a wide range of natural colors. Romeldale sheep are a composite sheep breed, developed in Gerber, California in the early 1900s. To create this breed A.T. Spencer crossed New Zealand Marsh Romney rams over Rambouillet ewes. J.K. Sexton and his family further established the Romeldale sheep breed, and it was within their flock that the first CVM (California Variegated Mutant) sheep were born. In subsequent years, Glen Eidman, a partner of the Sexton family, developed the CVM derivative of the Romeldale sheep. Romeldale/CVM sheep are long-lived, have docile and alert personalities, and are an intelligent sheep breed.

Products we offer from our sheep:

  • Raw Fleece
  • Roving
  • Millspun yarn
  • Felted items
  • Pelts
  • Breeding Stock

Website:

Facebook:

Breed Association: National Romeldale-CVM Conservancy

Scottish Blackface Sheep ~ Wilde Thistle Farm

We are a small farm in Fairplay MD. The majority of our animals are for our kid, Tucker and Robbie to show in 4-H. The others are just for pets because we love animals. We have dairy steers, a donkey, meat and dairy goats, sheep, rabbits, pet pigs and a variety of poultry

A medium-sized sheep, the Scottish Blackface is famous for its hardiness. It is a breed that is easy to recognize by its iconic black and white marked face. Both sexes of Scottish Blackface have horns. The ewes are good at raising lambs, showing excellent maternal instincts and ample milk production. They tend to be quite protective mothers.

The Scottish Blackface has wool that is coarse and long. This coat is well-suited to the harsh winds and difficult weather conditions of the Scottish highlands.

Products we offer from our sheep:

  • Breeding Stock

Facebook: Wilde Thistle Farm

Breed Association: Scottish Blackface Sheep Registry

Shetland Sheep ~ Sweet Grass Farm/Seven Hills Shetlands

On our farm in Wysox PA live 30 registered Shetland Sheep and two mini donkeys, Daisy and Olivia. We process our wool for spinning and weaving. Also on our farm we also have a sweet grass patch that is grown here to make baskets and bracelets and smudges.

Products we offer from our sheep:

  • Raw Fleece
  • Washed Fleece or locks
  • Roving
  • Millspun yarn
  • Handspun yarn
  • Breeding Stock

Website: fiberartistmarket.com/vendors/sweetgrass/

Etsy: fiberartfreedom

Breed Association: North American Shetland Sheep Breeders

Valais Blacknose Sheep ~ Laurel Highland Farm

​Laurel Highland Farm is located in Cogan Station, Pennsylvania, and is home to the “world’s cutest sheep”- Swiss Valais Blacknose! We began “breeding up” Blacknose sheep withimported seman in 2017. More recently we were finally able to import frozen embryos, so we now have purebred Blacknose here in Pennsylvania!

The Valais Blacknose is a large breed of sheep native to the Swiss Alps. They have a beautiful and very unique appearance, with a black nose, ears and “boots”; eye, knee and hock spots; long curly fleece; as well as a calm friendly disposition

Products we offer from our sheep:

  • Raw Fleece
  • Washed Fleece or locks
  • Registered & Unregistered Breeding Stock
  • Raw Fleece
  • Washed Fleece
  • Roving
  • Milspun Yarns

Website: valais-blacknose-sheep.com

Facebook: valais.blacknose.sheep

Breed Association: Valais Blacknose Sheep Society

Llamas ~ Snowy Oaks Llamas & Fibers: Booth 25 -26 in the Cattle Barn

​Snowy Oaks is located across from Elk Mountain in Susquehanna County, PA. We have have fiber, guard and companion Llamas.

Llamas are a member of the camelid family, which includes camels, alpacas, vicunas, and guanacos. Historically, in the wild, they were found in the Andes Mountains of South America, where they were farmed and domesticated for hundreds of years for meat, milk, wool, and for use as pack animals. They are now farmed in many countries worldwide.

The llama’s under-coat wool is known for its softness, whereas the upper-coat wool (known as “guard hairs”) is a little coarser, and serves to protect llamas from debris and rain. Both coats are used for weaving into fibers. Llamas are social animals and live in herds. Visit Snowy Oaks Llamas in booth 25 -26 in the Cattle Barn to learn more about them

  • Raw Fleece
  • Roving
  • Yarns

Alpacas ~ Alpacas in the Glen: Booth 35-36 in the Cattle Barn

Holly Jacobs and husband Todd are owners of Alpacas in the Glen of Smithville Flats, NY. They started in 2008 raising Huacaya and Suri alpacas. Currently their herd consists of just the Huacaya. Along with her alpacas Holly raises sheep, rabbits, chickens, guinea fowls, ducks, a few turkeys and recently added two mini donkeys. Holly is also a member of the New York State Alpaca Organization and a board member of the Empire Alpaca Association for 7 years. Holly runs the Rosehaven Fiber Mill in the Bethel Woods area in New York.

Alpacas are members of the Camelid Family and are a domesticated species of the South American camelid. The alpaca comes in two breed types: huacaya (pronounced wuh-KAI-ya) and suri (SUR-ee). Huacayas, the more common type, account for about 85-90% of all alpacas. The two breed types vary primarily in terms of their fiber. Visit Alpacas in the Glen in booth 35-36 in the Cattle Barn to learn more!

French Angora & Satin Angora Rabbits ~ Aboundingful Farm: Booth 23-24 in the Cattle Barn

Aboundingful Farm has been raising Angora Rabbits for over 25 years. This mother/daughter rabbitry has raised all breeds of Angoras at one time or another. Currently they only raise the French and Satin Angoras.

The fiber produced by an Angora rabbit is called Angora (The Angora goat produces Mohair). Angora fiber makes luxurious yarn, prized for its softness and warmth. This fiber can be harvested by various methods either shearing with clippers or scissors, or by using your fingers and gently pulling the molting fibers. Both methods are safe for the rabbits.

The American Rabbit Breeders Association recognizes four breeds of Angora rabbits — French, Satin, English, and Giant Angoras. Because most people raise Angoras for their wool, it is important to select the breed that meets your fiber needs. There are many colors available and the size of each breed vaires. Angora rabbits require much less space than larger fiber-producing animals such as sheep or alpacas. Each rabbit needs appropriate individual cage space, Housing should be well ventilated, but not drafty, with adequate lighting and protection from the elements. For more information stop by and talk to Ellen or Karina in booth 23-24 in the Cattle Barn